Knowledgebase

June 10, 2010 at 05:51 | Posted in Indonesia, Research | Leave a comment
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Knowledgebase, some concept I read about long ago

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Database management

June 10, 2010 at 04:32 | Posted in Indonesia, Research | Leave a comment
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My German boss asked me… what do I suggest him to do when his customers keep sending in new SOPs, procedures…

The current database is a database of emails; not organised, and contain outdated SOPs…

Could a company wiki be the solution? Web 2.0 for business?

http://webtrends.about.com/od/wiki/a/business-wiki.htm
http://mashable.com/2009/07/01/wikis-business-projects/
http://www.allbusiness.com/technology/computer-software-document-management/4353670-1.html

Feedback from my German boss in Hong Kong

June 9, 2010 at 07:43 | Posted in Indonesia, Work | Leave a comment

My German boss, stationed in Hong Kong finally came back from his month-long vacation.

He sent a feedback on my work, which I’ve read up to about 5 times.

Turns out he don’t quite understand his own email, and called to explain that he’s still suffering from jet lag… LOL

But whatever it is, some feedback is better than no feedback…still not hearing from my Singapore boss yet…

a great weekend =)

June 8, 2010 at 01:30 | Posted in Indonesia, Training Log, Travel, Work | Leave a comment
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A great weekend it has been.

Great workout on Saturday with my colleague Sumi, a steady long run (~40 minutes @ slower-than-10k pace) on Sunday…finally found out where everyone got their oversized cycling jerseys and tights, from the streets on Sunday morning. Funny that the sizes available are only from ‘L’ onwards, wonder how much air resistance that will be.

I don’t know how to best describe the roads on Sunday morning, hopefully the pictures could explain it all:

Visited Kota Tua in the afternoon, went into Fatahillah Museum (read another review here: http://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g294229-d379328-r29465093-Fatahillah_Square_Taman_Fatahillah-Jakarta_Java.html#REVIEWS) to get an understanding of the old town. I would recommend just going in to have a look even if you are not a history buff, it’s probably the quickest way to understand the history of the area. Thanks to my colleague’s friend Melly, who became my tour guide of the day.

Wanted to explore the old town a little further, but it was too crowded… so it was lunch @ Café Batavia.

Rated online as “must-visit”, price range was indeed a little steep on local standards, but it’s a “once in a lifetime” experience, so why not…

Salmon sandwich with Avocado

Food was decent, not exactly fantastic, but the atmosphere is what defines the restaurant… a good place to visit if you have the chance.

Photos are not exactly allowed to be taken, so check out the funky toilet:

There’s live music as well, heard this singer speaking fluent English, Mandarin, Japanese… no idea how many more languages he knows

Melly being the true-blue foodie then brought me to Seneyan City for more food, at the same time, immerse in the mall culture of Jakartans.

A happy and fruitful weekend!!!

———————————————–

Having completed my tasks in Jakarta, I can’t really do anything productive related to the internship.
I have sent my findings to the development team in Singapore (bypassing my Singapore boss totally), waiting for them to get back to me on what other information they require for development.

Treated my colleagues to a lunch of hoka bento, everyone was happy, so am I…

Dinner was pasta, pancakes, and waffles with Sumi & Melly… stuffed full after that.

Looking forward to home-sweet-home Singapore

Final weekend at Jakarta with a companion…

June 5, 2010 at 11:33 | Posted in Indonesia, Training Log, Travel | Leave a comment
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Thanks to my colleague who have kindly offered to bring me around, my final weekend here in Jakarta is more interesting.

Had my first ever yoga lesson and it’s right here at a Jakarta gym.
Then a “six-pack” lesson which brings me memories of my army sergeant telling me that only in Army, you get the training what other people pay for at California Fitness & Fitness First for FREE… and after today, i think it’s true.

Tomorrow will be a trip to Kota, and a meal at Cafe Batavia, then a swim somewhere near my hotel.

Terima kasih Sumi! 

Tomorrow

Chicken and Pig

June 3, 2010 at 09:41 | Posted in Indonesia, Work | Leave a comment
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I feel like the pig, and my boss is only the chicken… hmm
http://www.implementingscrum.com/2006/09/11/the-classic-story-of-the-pig-and-chicken/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chicken_and_the_Pig

unproductive day

June 2, 2010 at 10:31 | Posted in Indonesia, Work | Leave a comment

shit, I did nothing productive today.

Conducted an interview in the morning and that’s about it… shit

Pancasila

June 1, 2010 at 14:02 | Posted in Indonesia | Leave a comment
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While having my dinner at the hotel cafe and flipping through Jakarta Post, I found out that today marks the 65th anniversary of Pancasila.


Probably what kept me safe while walking on the streets of Jakarta is this ideology of Pancasila…

http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2010/06/01/diversity-despite-unity.html
On the first of June 65 years ago, Sukarno, who became the first president of the Republic of Indonesia, delivered his monumental speech later named “The Birth Of Pantja Sila” (Lahirnya Pantja Sila).

This speech was published in 1964 together with his courses on the same topic under the title of Tjamkan Pantja Sila. Pantja Sila Dasar Falsafah Negara (Thoughts on Pantja Sila. Pantja Sila the Philosophical Foundation of the State).

The 193-page booklet has fallen into a signifi cant oblivion over the last 12 years and is now hard to get in bookstores.

Nevertheless, thoughts on Pancasila remain relevant, particularly for two reasons.

First, like it or not, it is still embedded in the Constitution of 1945 and therefore comands at least legal compliance from the state’s institutions, if not from Indonesian citizens in general.

Second, Sukarno seemed to have unmistakenly hypostatized the mode of Indonesian life marked by cultural diversity into the principles of Pancasila.

The first reason could be of pro forma relevance as it may well lead to political hypocrisy. The second reason, however, is an attempt to bring the diversity inherent in Indonesian society and its cultures (yes: cultures, and not culture) under one roof. This project, however, is not without outstanding
question marks.

To the extent that diversity is still inherent in Indonesian life, there will be a need to compare it with American pluralism. The motto “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity in Diversity) in the old Javanese Kawi language inscribed on a scroll gripped by the claws of the Garuda (eagle) indeed resembles the Latin “E Pluribus Unum” marked on a scroll held by the beak of the American eagle. Yet each of them has distinct connotations of their own.

Whereas the Kawi statement purports to connote “diverse, and yet of the same kind”, the Latin version means rather “out of many, one”.

The difference underlying the mindset of the Indonesian and American founding fathers is intriguing.

The Indonesians experience diversity in their life leading to a sort of cultural diversity, while the Americans seem to be more familiar with the plurality that marks their cultural pluralism.

Cultural diversity indicates “the cultural differences that exist between people, such as language, dress and traditions,” as well as “significant variations in the way societies organize themselves, in their shared conception of morality, and in the ways they interact with their environment.” (en.wikipedia. org/wiki/cultural_diversity).

On the other hand, cultural pluralism sees “smaller groups within a larger society maintain their unique cultural identities, and whose values and practices are accepted by the wider culture.” (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/cultural_pluralism).

Provided that we can accept these definitions, which are accessible online by anybody, some conceptual differences can be drawn. Cultural diversity in fact underlines cultural differences among the cultural units of a society and their capacity to share common values.

Whereas cultural pluralism is a stance that accepts different cultural identities thereby making them part of the common culture, which leads to the term “American melting pot.”

As the pluralistic “melting pot” comes from a position that accepts differences, a society that rests on cultural diversity seems to need the capacity to build a common denominator for the different cultures to stay together in a larger framework.

Whereas the pluralistic “melting pot” absorbs differences, a society that rests on cultural diversity has the need to accommodate differences.

Consequently, a society that rests on cultural diversity risks having certain elements that may insist on being different and insist on their differentiation. “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” being a symbolic reifi cation of Pancasila indeed seems to risk such a situation.

The fact of cultural diversity underlying the concept of Pancasila leads to the consequence that there will always be elements that see themselves different from and beyond the Pancasila framework.

Nevertheless, as the Constitution of 1945 documented the vow to build a republic that is for any and all Indonesians, Indonesians shoulder the perennial task of embracing those who are “different from Pancasila”.

As such, Indonesians have to make sure that even those who are “different from Pancasila” have an equally pleasant place under the common roof of the republic.

Indubitably, such a stance needs a lot of tolerance, which is a “thing” that sounds very strange to the Indonesian ear nowadays.

No wonder, because in a social political setting where corruption is rampant and the gap between the haves and the have-nots is striking and widening, there will indeed be very little place for tolerance.

In other words, we are still far from Pancasila as a reality. The longer we fail to realize Pancasila, the stronger the arguments for those who are “different from Pancasila” to push for another alternative.

Indonesians have to make sure that even those who are “different from Pancasila” have an equally pleasant place.

The writer is a professor at the School of Philosophy, Parahyangan Catholic University, Bandung.

going Bali…

June 1, 2010 at 11:12 | Posted in Indonesia, Work | Leave a comment

of course I’m only joking…

After tomorrow, when I conduct my one last interview and fill in the missing puzzle pieces, I’ll have seriously nothing left to do…

And very soon my Singapore boss will go on leave, which doesn’t make any difference now since he’s not replying my emails, so what next? go Bali?

I need some direction, at least tell me whether am I on the right direction, or am I missing out on anything… or he doesn’t give a hoot about this… hmm…

Active Sunday

May 30, 2010 at 04:23 | Posted in Indonesia, Travel | Leave a comment
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So my boss was right…the Jakarta roads were indeed closed on Sundays for people to run, skate, and cycle. You see people with all sorts of bikes: mountain bikes, foldable bikes, gentleman bikes, road bikes, time-trial bikes, and even one guy wearing a clown hat on top of a very tall bike… Then there are the skaters, most impressed by the train of speed skaters… And there were the runners, the national running attire seems to be a windbreaker + trackpants, some very conservative and obviously hot attire in this sunny Islamic country… there’s a bunch of boys probably school runners wearing the more familiar singlet and running shorts… for me, I guess my cotton t-shirt and soccer shorts should do the trick… Started the run and went into my 10-k pace, but obviously I’m not as fit as before… about 15 minutes into the run and i got to stop, and 1 felt giddy for not having eaten anything in the morning, walked back to hotel…same old breakfast Photos of the amazing sight next week, when i saw that the roads were closed this morning to motor vehicles, I didn’t wanted to waste time to head back to my room to retrieve the camera… i immediately started my run

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